Counseling

Trained in pastoral care at Seattle University's School of Theology and Ministry, Dr. Michelle Majors specializes in two key areas of counseling:

  1. Girls and young women of color who are dealing with issues related to self-esteem, focus, interpersonal dynamics and confidence.
  2. Women who are transitioning through break-ups and relationship issues or struggles.

Counseling for Young Women & Girls of Color

A substantial body of literature confirms the concerns of African American youngsters who experience social distress, academic difficulties, poverty, despair and violence.  Even when they are not experiencing many of these conditions, adolescence alone will cause feelings of confusion, frustration, isolation and overall dejection.  Having a third-party advocate for your daughter can make a difference.  

"I told her the exact same thing you did, but for some reason she heard you". ~ parent

As it relates to young women and girls, Michelle practices culturally responsive counseling.  Culturally responsive counseling is a practice that acknowledges the issues that are particular to young women and girls whose race and backgrounds don't mirror the cultural mainstream of the American society. In other words, she strives to work with girls from marginalized groups recognizing the complex and dynamic intersections of race, culture and class as implications on how they function, what they hope for and what they BELIEVE is possible.  

Michelle has worked with hundreds of young women to help them change their story about themselves and their possibilities. 

Areas of focus are: 

  • Self-esteem
  • Friend issues
  • Self-confidence
  • Mood shifts/swings
  • Early relationship problems
  • Isolating from friends and family
  • School or work challenges
  • Achievement issues
  • Life directions
  • Goal setting

Relationship Counseling

A study published in Social Psychological and Personality Science found that discussing a breakup and considering the reasons why it might have happened is often helpful.  Having the opportunity to objectively reflect on one's self and the events of a completed relationship helps regain a sense of clarity, which makes it easier to get the lesson and move on.  Many people suffer post-breakup because they are locked into a story about the breakup.  This story usually paints them as a victim, which may be true, but only keeps them angry and hurt.

My work is about changing your story. 

Fusing two decades of community advocacy for issues related to women and girls, 10 years of leading seminars and workshops, seven years of coaching, hundreds of hours of personal development training, a lifetime of personal experience, Michelle specializes in assisting women as they deal with the ending of a relationship and move on "baggage-free".

You'll be able to:

  • ​Better handle the stress and anxiety of moving on
  • Address the core issues that lay at the heart of the relationship
  • Deal with the anger, grief and sadness that grip day-to-day experiences
  • Begin to put the pieces in place to create a new future